Basic First Aid Tips for Babies and Toddlers

medAs a parent, it’s really imperative to learn basic First Aid. We all know how much it hurts (the parents…emotionally mostly) if our babies take a fall. If your little bub has started achieving developmental milestones like crawling, rolling, pulling themselves up, reaching out etc, then this post is very important for you. Also a good read for those parents whose children are generally known as ‘calamity Janes’ in the playground 😀

The key in most injuries is: DO NOT PANIC. Guess the number of times this rule is broken each time calamity Jane struck our house? Answer: Every. Bleddy. Time. Daddy Dear hits panic button anytime our baby starts bawling after getting hurt. His pulse racing, face and palms sweating, eyes glazed and staring into oblivion (daddy’s, not the baby).

I agree it gives us all a heartattack, but we have to start by assessing how bad the injury is. In most falls and the accompanying screaming, the baby cries mostly because he is startled and shocked. As a parent or a witness to the incident, your instinct will guide you into understanding the severity of the situation. Comforting the baby and a quick physical evaluation of the child will help you in deciphering if a trip to the Hospital, or a call to the Doctor is required.

Incase of any severe fall or head injury, it’s crucial to closely monitor the baby for the next 24 hours. A hospital visit is REQUIRED if ANY (one or more) of the following are observed:

  • Unconscious or fainted after injury
  • Drowsiness or alteration in consciousness
  • Severe and persistent headache (baby will try and shake head whilst also crying)
  • Vomiting (different from a regular baby spitup)
  • Dizziness / double or blurred vision (baby will show peculiar eye movement)
  • One pupil (black part of the eye) visibly larger than the other
  • Neck stiffness
  • Convulsions or fits
  • Strange behavior (baby is less active/alert)
  • Very slow and rapid pulse
  • Any unusual breathing pattern

What to do in case of nose/ear/wound bleed following an injury?

Swelling / Bleeding from Nose or Ears

Apply an ice pack immediately. Area for application needs to be the nose & cheeks or bridge of nose. You can use the frozen vegetable packets from your freezer, but ensure that anything which you apply, needs to be covered in a cloth or towel and NOT touching the skin directly.

  • DO NOT block the nose or ears, let it drain.
  • DO NOT press down on the wound if you suspect a skull fracture.
  • Arrange to go to the hospital for further treatment.

Bleeding from the wound

It’s important to stop the bleeding. You can do so by applying direct pressure.

  • However DO NOT press down on the wound if you suspect a skull fracture.
  • Arrange to go to the hospital for further treatment.

In most of the open wounds, it is advisable not to attempt at cleaning the wound as it may trigger further bleeding. Keep it covered with a sterile bandage. If one gets soaked, apply another one on top and so forth.

If you do suspect a skull fracture, or an injury to the spine or neck after a fall, try to keep your baby calm and still. By moving them you may end up causing more harm. Call your local emergency number immediately for medical support at the scene of the fall.

According to Redcross “once you have treated the swelling by applying something cold to the baby or child’s head injury, and if they are not displaying signs of a serious head injury, you could let them sleep. Ensure you check on them regularly.” You can imagine how shaken the baby must also be.

It does not mean each bump and fall requires a trip to panic room. As a parent, you will ‘know’ which injuries require immediate medical assistance. So follow your instinct. No one knows your baby more than you. When in doubt, DO call the doctor. Following any head injury remember… ‘Evaluate with your head and not your heart’

End of the day, the best way to help your baby is to make their environment safer. Towards lesser injuries and more milestones 🙂

And let us know if you have any tips. We would know to have them included in the post. Take care. Stay safe 🙂

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5 Basic Tips on Handling a Newborn | First Time Parents | All You Need To Know

Tips on handling a newborn the mommy blog india

If you haven’t already spent a lot of time around newborn babies, their fragility may be intimidating. But the newborn phase is one of the most cherished phases in any parents’ life. So today I’m a few basics to remember when handling a newborn. These tips are more of little lessons, I personally learned in the past years.

1)  Keep hands clean:

First things first, always remember to wash your hands or use a hand sanitizer before handling your newborn baby. We generally don’t bother much about this. But then, newborns don’t have a strong immune system yet, so they are susceptible to infection. Also make sure that everyone who handles your baby has clean hands.

2)  Carrying your baby:

Be careful to support your baby’s head and neck. Cradle the baby’s head when carrying her and support the head when carrying the baby upright or when you lay your baby down.

Be careful not to shake your newborn, whether in play or in frustration. Shaking that is vigorous can cause bleeding in the brain and even death. Try tickling your baby’s feet or blow gently on to the cheek when you need to wake her up.

Always have your baby securely fastened into the stroller or carrier whenever on-the-go. Limit any activity that could be too rough or bouncy. Your newborn is not yet ready for rough play, such as being jiggled on the knee or thrown in the air.

3)  Feeding your baby: 

Breast milk is the best you can give your child. So stick to it unless there’s a reason. Newborns do not need anything expect breast milk or formula. So do not offer water or any juice.

Newborn babies have a very unpredictable feeding schedule. They need to be fed on regular intervals, starting from eight to twelve times a day. So may be every second hour or so. Or when ever the baby demands for it.

When hungry babies will show signs of hunger such as making lip movements, sucking thumb, stirring or stretching. Don’t wait for them to get cranky and fussy, because that’s the next level of hunger.

Stop feeding when your baby stops sucking or turns her face way from the breast, it means that he or she is full. As your baby gets older, he or she will take in more milk in less time at each feeding.

Formulas are not interchangeable. Once you have started on one brand and type, stick with it. Every change in formula sets off a 3-5 day adjustment period for baby’s digestive system that can result in increased gassiness and fussiness. All changes in formula should be approved by the pediatrician.

4)  Bathing your baby: 

As long as you’re doing a good job of cleaning your baby’s diaper area during changes, two or three baths a week probably are plenty for a newborn.

A sponge bath with water is usually enough, especially until the umbilical cord stump falls off.

In the winter season, when skin is likely to become dry or flaky, you may want to bathe her even less. Whether you’re giving a sponge or tub bath, always test the water temperature using your elbow or the inside of your wrist (the water should be lukewarm). Remember hot wash can cause major burns to your baby’s delicate skin.

Always keep your supplies like towel, washcloth, shampoo and baby soap within reach before you begin bathing a newborn.

Stick with mild, unscented products formulated for babies. Do not use any homemade or over-the-counter products when it comes to a newborn.

5)  Diapering your baby: 

By the time your baby arrives, you might have already decided whether you want to cloth diaper or use disposables. Either way, check out the best deals around and have loads and loads of them stocked up much before the baby arrives.

Change diapers frequently, every 2 hours whether you are using cloth diapers or disposables or after every bowel movement. Always wipe the area gently with a clean washcloth or a disposable wipe. In case of diaper rash apply coconut oil generously all over the area and let the baby remain diaper-free for at least a few hours a day.

If you are using cloth diapers and having diaper rash, then it could be due to detergent built-up. Trying stripping your cloth diapers and use detergents that do not contain any fragrance or dye.  In case of severe rash, always see your pediatrician.

So once you have these basics down, I’m sure you be one happy parent to you little bundle of joy. And of course it does call for some extra patience and time. After all your a parent to a brand new baby. 🙂

 

** The above post, as stated is purely based on my own experience and isn’t a proven one. Always remember that every child is different. Something that worked for us, may not necessarily work for you.

Ramadan Series: 3 Easy Tip For A Well Stocked Freezer

ramadan tips The Mommy Blog

The holy time of the year is just around the corner – Ramadan! And when that realization hits us, we try our best to try and prepare our selves for this month and get the most out of the blessed days. Alas, we forget one main concern: food.

It’s not so much forgotten as being unprepared for. We remember it as the month of being deprived during the day and feasting at night. However, with all our spiritual aims and goals of maximum ibadah (worship) during Ramadan, precious hours spent in the kitchen can drain us physically and emotionally.

This is going to be our first Ramadan away from India and as a of family of four. And two little girls under four years of age. I had to plan a lot of things beforehand. I started planning for Ramadan, 3 weeks prior.  And I have been meaning to do a blog post for all my Muslim mommy friends so they could make use of it.

And only yesterday, I shared a picture of my freezer on my Instagram, and from then on, I have been receiving a lot of emails and messages on how-tos, which is why I just sat down to quickly jot everything down for you to read and make the best use. 😀

Thank you all for your emails and messages, I feel so loved :)

And in this post I will quickly you give heads up on how and what to stock in your freezer, before Ramadan begins.

1.  Start by listing everything you need: 

Sit down peacefully and think of what fruits and vegetables you will need very often, those that go in pretty much every dish. For example onions and celery. Put these on the top, so you don’t forget them later.

Next think of the vegetables that you want to stock on and if you have kids, see what they like and quickly make a note of them.

If you have decided to freeze them, then you will need freezer bags or vacuum sealing bags, if you can find them. I used regular zip-lock bags and a straw to draw out the air from the bags, works just fine.

You will also need a clean towel or tissue papers to pat dry the veggies before freezing (depends on the type of vegetable).

2.  Pick fresh fruits & vegetables: 

Start by selecting the most freshest of the fruits and vegetables, you can find at the grocery store. If possible head to the farmer’s market and pick them up at the earliest ( when they are just out of the farm).

Avoid vegetables and fruits with blemish or marks. They generally won’t last you long.

If you don’t have time, ask someone close to pick them up for you, your husband or help. I couldn’t go out myself, so husband got everything for us. Yes he does better grocery shopping than I do! *sigh*

3.  Start prepping the fruits & vegetables:

Freezing is a process that lets you store fruits and vegetables without losing their nutritional benefits, over time, provided they are frozen properly. Now by ‘properly’ I mean that not every vegetable can just be chopped and popped in to the freezer, that way they won’t last you over a week.

So here’s the list of things I have frozen so far and the method I followed:

Freezing onions & capsicum:

  1. Selected fresh and blemish-free onions.
  2. Peel, wash and chop them into 1/2 inch slices.
  3. Spread it flat on a tray and pop the tray in to the freezer for at least 2 hours.
  4. Once all the pieces turn into solid, divide them into meal size portions.
  5. Put them into the zip-lock bags, draw the air out of the bags, with straw and seal.
  6. Then immediately put them back into the freezer.

Freezing carrots, corn. beetroots, beans and cabbage:

  1. Select fresh and blemish-free vegetables.
  2. Clean, wash and chop them into desired sizes (preferably small).
  3. Heat a large pot of water and start bringing it to boil.
  4. Once the water is boiling, put the vegetables in it.
  5. Grab your watch and keep an eye on it. You don’t want to cook the vegetables.
  6. When the water starts boiling again, turn off the heat.
  7. Quickly scoop the pieces of vegetables from hot water, and put them into ice cold water to avoid the vegetables getting cooked further (with their own heat).
  8. Drain the water.
  9. Pat them dry and store in the zip-lock bags.

Tips:

  • Keep an eye on your watch. So you don’t boil the vegetables for more than 2 minutes. Or they will get mushy.
  • Always try to keep the boiling time same as the cooling time. For example if you are boiling for 1 minute, then let then stay in ice cold water for 1 minute.
  • Boiling will kill all the enzymes and cooling then down will lock the nutrients in it. That way they will remain fresh for a longer period of time.

Freezing chicken for sandwich: 

  1. Wash and boil boneless (you can also use boned) chicken in salt and whole black pepper for 20-25 minutes until its cooked.
  2. Remove the chicken and let it cool a little.
  3. Shred it in to pieces using two forks (it’s easier that way).
  4. Divided into meal size portions and freeze int zip-lock bags.

I mix mayonnaise with shredded chicken. Spread it on a slice of bread. Top it off with slices of cucumbers and tomatoes for a super quick kids breakfast.

These frozen fruits and vegetables can be stored at least up to 6 months. Many people claim to be saving theirs for a year. But I can only talk from my experience, I had frozen beans in March and used the last batch only yesterday. And trust me when I say this I couldn’t find any noticeable difference, in the taste.

So these are all that I have frozen so far. I also plan on freeze a bunch of fruits soon. Let me know how you are prepping for Ramadan this year. I would love to hear it for you. Also please leave a comment down below and tell me if you found these tips useful for Ramadan 🙂